Sep 17th / 808 notes
abystle:

Detail from the Pains of Hell, by an anonymous 18th century painter. The painting resides at Pinacoteca de La Profesa, Mexico City.

abystle:

Detail from the Pains of Hell, by an anonymous 18th century painter. The painting resides at Pinacoteca de La Profesa, Mexico City.

Sep 8th / 616 notes
mariellehb:

Anatomy of Satan. The Resurrectionist, E.B. Hudspeth

mariellehb:

Anatomy of Satan. The Resurrectionist, E.B. Hudspeth

Sep 8th / 2,980 notes

jessipewp:

Jean-Edouard Dargent - Illustrations from Dante’s Divine Comedy, 1870

Sep 8th / 246 notes

lindahall:

Robert Fludd - Scientist of the Day

Robert Fludd, an English physician and Hermetic philosopher, died Sep. 8, 1637, at age 63.  Fludd is best known for his mammoth encyclopedia, Utriusque cosmi maioris scilicet et minoris metaphysica (History of the Macrocosm and Microcosm, 1617-19), the last gasp of a Renaissance magical world view that saw an interconnected universe filled with correspondences and sympathies. The book is famous for its engraved plates that illustrate these connections, such as the wonderful title page, depicting a human form, the microcosm, overlying the planetary spheres, the macrocosm (see first image above). Another plate illustrates a cosmic monochord, with each planet corresponding to a musical tone, demonstrating the harmony of the spheres (see second image above). Numerous brackets connect various elemental, celestial, and angelic spheres, with labels such as “octave,” “fifth”, and “fourth” identifying the interconnecting harmonies.

Fludd’s images drew an attack from Johannes Kepler, who at the time was completing his own Harmonices mundi (Harmonies of the world, 1619), and at the end of this work he weighed in on Fludd. Kepler discovered his harmonies by measuring such things as planetary distances and speeds, and by looking for harmonic ratios in those figures. Fludd, he argues, just made them up. It makes for a pretty picture, but if the harmonies don’t correspond to any numbers in the real world, then they are just nonsense, argued Kepler. This brief contretemps epitomizes the difference between the Renaissance and the 17th century world views, the one proposing correspondences everywhere, the other insisting that a correspondence not grounded in a physical measurement is a phantasm. Fludd replied, and then Kepler, and then Fludd again, and needless to say, neither convinced the other. It is hard to have a conversation when there is no common ground. Such is often the case when world views collide.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Sep 8th / 84 notes
ella-luci-bel:

Cornelia Paczka-Wagner

ella-luci-bel:

Cornelia Paczka-Wagner

Sep 8th / 26 notes

A Russian print of the Old One

A Russian print of the Old One

Sep 8th / 1,234 notes
santino3:

Lucas Cranach, the Elder
"Venus"
1531
(oil on panel, 38,7 x 24,5 cm)

santino3:

Lucas Cranach, the Elder

"Venus"

1531

(oil on panel, 38,7 x 24,5 cm)

Sep 3rd / 195 notes

Macabre

Macabre

Sep 3rd / 846 notes
fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

Image from page 260 of “A child’s book of warriors” (1907) by Internet Archive Book Images on Flickr.
Which norse gods do you recognize?

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

Image from page 260 of “A child’s book of warriors” (1907) by Internet Archive Book Images on Flickr.

Which norse gods do you recognize?

Sep 2nd / 172 notes

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